What Is a 9A Report?

Real estate transactions can be complex and involve a lot of paperwork. One type of document that may be required in some states is a 9A Report. This report is important because it provides information about a property’s compliance with local building codes and zoning laws. In this article, we will explain what a 9A Report is, who needs to file it, what information it contains, and more.

What is a 9A Report?

A 9A Report is a document that provides information about a property’s compliance with local building codes and zoning laws. It is typically required in Massachusetts and is named after the section of state law that mandates its creation. The report is prepared by a licensed architect or engineer and includes information about the property’s physical condition, use, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Understanding the Purpose & Importance of a 9A Report

The purpose of a 9A Report is to provide information to potential buyers about a property’s compliance with applicable laws and regulations. It can also be used by lenders and insurers to assess the risk associated with a property. The report is important because it helps ensure that the property is safe and compliant with applicable laws.

Who Needs to File a 9A Report?

In Massachusetts, the owner of a building or property that is over 35,000 cubic feet in size or has over 10,000 square feet of gross floor area must file a 9A Report every five years. The report must be prepared by a licensed architect or engineer and submitted to the local building department.

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What Information is Required in a 9A Report?

A 9A Report must include information about the property’s physical condition, use, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. This includes information about the building’s structural integrity, fire safety, accessibility, and more. The report may also include recommendations for repairs or upgrades to bring the property into compliance with local codes and regulations.

How to Obtain a 9A Report

To obtain a 9A Report, the owner of a building or property must hire a licensed architect or engineer to prepare the report. The report must be submitted to the local building department in accordance with state law. The cost of the report will vary depending on the size and complexity of the property.

The Role of a 9A Report in Real Estate Transactions

A 9A Report is an important document in real estate transactions because it provides information about a property’s compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Buyers and lenders may require a 9A Report before completing a sale or issuing a loan. The report can also be used by insurers to assess the risk associated with a property.

The Consequences of Not Filing a 9A Report

Failing to file a 9A Report in Massachusetts can result in fines and penalties. It can also delay or prevent the sale of a property or the issuance of a loan. Additionally, if a property is found to be non-compliant with local laws and regulations, the owner may be required to make costly repairs or upgrades.

Frequently Asked Questions about 9A Reports

Q: Who is responsible for filing a 9A Report?
A: The owner of a building or property is responsible for filing a 9A Report.

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Q: How often does a 9A Report need to be filed?
A: In Massachusetts, a 9A Report must be filed every five years.

Q: Can a 9A Report be prepared by anyone?
A: No, a 9A Report must be prepared by a licensed architect or engineer.

Q: What information is included in a 9A Report?
A: A 9A Report includes information about a property’s physical condition, use, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations.

Q: How much does a 9A Report cost?
A: The cost of a 9A Report will vary depending on the size and complexity of the property.

In conclusion, a 9A Report is an important document in real estate transactions in Massachusetts. It provides information about a property’s compliance with applicable laws and regulations and can be required by buyers, lenders, and insurers. Failing to file a 9A Report can result in fines and penalties and may delay or prevent the sale of a property. If you need to file a 9A Report, be sure to hire a licensed architect or engineer to prepare the report and submit it to the local building department.


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